Stripping away our Safety

Derby City Council are planning on degrading and removing cycling infrastructure on Friargate between Brick St and Bridge St.

The plans will see the removal of a bus/ cycle lane to create space for two lanes of cars.

The plans will increase the number of cars, increase pollution and increase the danger to road cyclists.

We want you to join us at this protest. Bring a bike, a placard, an instrument or just yourself.

We are going to organise bike rides around the infrastructure and have invited local councillors to join us.

We want to inform the public of these dangerous changes that will strip away our safety. Protest starts at 11am and at 11:30 members of the group’s committee and anyone else who wants to join us will strip down to their underwear in protest. Protest likely to end around 12 noon.

Surprisingly the media will also be invited. Meet before 11am on Saturday 16th Feb at junction of Friar Gate and Vernon Street.

The council’s plans are unacceptable and dangerous.

Submit video footage to the Police

Derbyshire Police are now encouraging people to submit dash cam or other video footage of road traffic offences for them to review and process as appropriate (warning, prosecution, etc.).

More details here

It’s good see in the police information that “It’s vital to remember that the vulnerable road users such as pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders are at much greater risk of serious injury and death than those in cars. Our priority should always be to protect those most vulnerable.”

Derby Clean Air Proposals – Where is the Cycling and Walking?

Derby’s Clean Air Preferred Option was out for consultation until today. The proposal failed entirely to provide any new infrastructure for cycling which, by enabling more people to cycle, would have helped reduce car travel and improved air quality.

But it went further than that.

It proposes that two pieces of cycle-specific infrastructure be removed: a permissive right turn from Friar Gate into Brick Street and a dedicated bus/cycle lane leading to the bus/cycle gate on Friar Gate at the junction of Bridge Street. Furthermore, wherever motor vehicles are to be prevented from making certain manoeuvres on Stafford Street and the Mercian Way roundabout, cyclists will be prohibited from making the same manoeuvres.

         All in all, a very short sighted approach, in our view.

Derby Cycling Group has submitted proposals for enhancements to the council scheme to make it much more cycle and pedestrian friendly. Read our response here:

Clean Air Preferred Option – DCG Response

We hope the Air Quality team will take these enhancements on board; we don’t see any reason why they should not because with only one exception, they do not take any road space away from motor traffic, and yet deliver fantastic benefits for those who travel by bike and some for pedestrians as well.

Previously we made a press release expressing our general issues with the initial proposal:    Press Release

New cycling offences: Government plans and consultation

New cycling offences: causing death or serious injury when cycling

In August 2018 the Government announced the consultation Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy safety review: proposal for new cycling offences. To address the few high profile incidents of cyclist causing the death of pedestrian, the Government propose to introduce new offences for causing death or serious injury by dangerous or careless cycling. This consultation seeks views on the new offences and the associated penalties, the consultation closes 11.45pm on 5 November 2018.

The Government instigated a review of the laws relating to cycling offences which was undertaken by Laura Thomas, a Barrister at Birketts LLP. The review considers the existing law applicable to cycling and driving, together with the respective penalties that may be applied; specific attention being paid to the offences of causing death or serious injury. The author concluded that disparities exist between the offences relating to cycling and driving, also in the penalties applicable to the respective offences.

The report puts a compelling case for the review of cycling offences and alignment of the penalties. However, the final clause states; ‘Considering the wider impact of legislative change, this review is focused specifically on cycling. However, some of the issues outlined above would apply in respect of all non-mechanically propelled vehicles such as horses, horse and carriages etc. This is particularly so if, rather than setting out new legislation specifically for cyclists; there was an amendment to existing legislation to remove the “mechanically propelled” stipulation.’ This suggestion would apply a consistent set of offences to all road users, not just focusing on cyclist. Continue reading New cycling offences: Government plans and consultation

A38 Derby Junctions – Consultation: Ask for Better Cycle Routes

Highways England have a project to create “grade separated” junctions at the Kingsway, Markeaton and Little Eaton Islands on the A38.  That means the local roads will be at ground level, but the A38 carriageway will be either above or below the local roads, on a bridge or in an underpass. DCG have been campaigning to make the scheme deliver good quality cycling and walking routes alongside and crossing the A38 as well as the “improvements” for motorised traffic. It is important that the A38 becomes less of a barrier for cycling and walking than it is today, and that this project enables more local journeys to be made without a car.

The project is out for consultation now, please submit a response supporting the cycling schemes already being proposed but also asking for even more and better improvements than these.

Deadline: end of Thursday 18th October, 2018

There is an online form where you can answer pre-set questions :  A38 Online Response Form

and you can also e-mail the project team with your own ideas at.   A38DerbyJunctions@highwaysengland.co.uk

We recommend you fill in the form, AND send an e-mail if you have other points which you wish to make that are not covered by their questionnaire.

DCG is submitting a formal response to the cycling elements of the scheme, here is the draft of that response:                                                        A38 Derby Junctions Consultation – DCG Response Oct 2018

A38 Consultation Page and Documents

In April 2018, DCG met with Highways England’s agents, AECom. We presented a list of requirements and after the meeting, marked up how well the project was planning the deliver them; see the results in theDCG A38 Derby Junctions Checklist .

The A38 junctions project always has had some intent of delivering better cycling and walking routes than exist today; they made some significant improvements by the time of our meeting in April and have made other improvements prior to this latest consultation.

However, there are still issues to address:

  • The project is not committed to segregated cycling and walking routes (ie where the cycling and walking paths are separated from each other).
  • Some routes are not direct, others are not continuous and at least one is ridiculously narrow.
  • There is great potential for better cycling routes leading to/from the new facilities proposed alongside/across the A38, but many have not been realised in the designs so far. There must be a plan to maximise the cycling and walking benefits from the A38 Junctions project by building these “nearby” feeder routes.

Completing the Consultation:                                                                          When you make your response, please ask the project to fulfil the following general criteria when they submit their final plans and the planning application:

  • The scheme must enable more people to travel locally without a car, specifically enabling more cycling and walking journeys
  • The scheme must provide continuous, direct, segregated cycling and walking routes, separated from the main A38 carriageway and its slip roads.
  • Where cycling and walking routes cross the A38 or its slip roads, signal controlled crossings must be provided.
  • All cycling and walking routes must be off-road, must be safe enough and feel safe enough, for parents to allow their children to use them to get to school or to visit friends.

In addition, the following specific requirements are important:

  • Retain the “curly bridge” over Queensway into Markeaton Park – this is planned to be replaced, make sure they know it’s important.
  • Build a good quality cycle path from Little Eaton to Pektron Islands alongside the A61 to replace the horrendously narrow path which is there now; buy land to enable a segregated path to be built.
  • Create a signal controlled crossing over the A61 onto the existing cycle path so you can cycle out of Breadsall without taking your life in your hands
  • Build the section of the Derwent Valley Cycleway from Haslams Lane to the A38, alongside the River Derwent.
  • Ensure existing cycle paths remain open AT ALL TIMES during the construction of the A38 junctions, including the provision of diversion which are ACCESSIBLE TO ALL riders and walkers.
  • All construction traffic must be required to have all the current cyclist detection technology fitted and operational, and work site entrances should employ Trixie mirrors to ensure drivers entering/leaving the site can see cyclists crossing on the cycle paths or on the road.

Derby Air Quality consultation

Derby City Council in currently in the process of consulting on their proposals to meet their legal requirements for air quality in Derby.

The Derby Cycling Group have provided the following response to the consultation. Members are also encouraged to provide their own feedback.


We are writing from Derby Cycling Group in response to the Council’s consultation on air quality in Derby. As a group involved in campaigning for cycle facilities in the city, and comprising approximately 400 members, we are a key stakeholder in the consultation process.

With regards to the Council’s Air Quality, Low Emission Policy, and proposals for reducing pollution levels below the specified maximums, we would make the following points which we would expect to be taken into consideration during the refinement of the proposals.

  1. All the proposed options contain non specific improvements to cycling infrastructure. These would be welcomed by the Derby Cycling Group but need to be made specific to allow for any informed comment. We welcome more details of the plans and would expect to be invited to comment.
  2. An overall reduction in traffic within the city would be welcomed as this would lead to a improved environment for cyclists (and hence increased numbers). It is important that the plans do not result in substitution of “dirty” vehicles with similar levels of “cleaner” larger vehicles.
  3. The option to rearrange traffic measures in Stafford Street does not address the underlying problem of poor air quality and just “games” the modelling to spread the same (or higher) pollution to allow the limit of NOx pollution in Stafford Street to be met. This might meet the letter of what is required by law but not the spirit. We would prefer to see measures that address reducing overall pollution rather than addressing the measurement of pollution at just one or two points.
  4. We are concerned about the impact Option 1 might have on existing cycling behaviour and provisions. Again, we welcome more details of the plan and would expect to be invited to comment. We would strongly resist any worsening of the current situation for cyclists.
  5. We would prefer to see additional options alongside the current 3 options which are at extreme ends of the possibilities (i.e. tinker with Stafford St or create a 24 hour a day charging zone). There should be scope for an additional option of a massive focus on active travel, a LCWIP and the creation of a good quality, connected cycle network.
  6. A design principle should be adopted that any cycling infrastructure in an area subject to a change is upgraded or enhanced as a consequence of that change, be that traffic management or reconstruction.
  7. We are concerned about one-off payments to favoured individuals or companies to allow for replacement of “dirty” vehicles when this money could be better spent on creating cycling infrastructure that would provide a long term benefit to pollution issues rather than a one off “hit”.
  8. Within the Low Emission Strategy, an additional focus area should be added as “transport cycle strategy” to put active travel on a par with EV, buses, taxis, etc. which each have their own focus area.
  9. Any grant / discount schemes for electric or low emission vehicles should also include the option of purchasing ebikes (for the whole family) as a solution.

We welcome the desire of the Council to address air quality issues within the city and would support any measures that improve the cycling infrastructure and encourage increased cycle usage within the city and the surrounding “travel to work” area.

We would welcome the chance to comment on detailed proposals as they are defined and would ask that the Derby Cycling Group is included in the list of stakeholders or interested parties during the review process.

Campaigning for cycle provision in Derby since 1979