St Peters Street and Cornmarket – Cycle Access 5pm to 10am

At Derby Cycling Group we have argued for many years that banning responsible cycling in the city centre suppresses the number of everyday journeys made by bike in Derby, because the north/south route through the city centre is the most direct one to get many people from where they live to where they work, and no suitable alternative routes were available. We are therefore really pleased to confirm the new arrangements for cycle access on St Peter’s Street and Cornmarket, even though they are only in “off-peak” times.  This new access means that between 5pm and 10am there is a complete route from The Spot, along St Peters Street, Cornmarket, Irongate and Queen Street, for access to and travel through the city centre.

Here is a summary of the new arrangements for cyclists access to St Peter’s Street and Cornmarket as we understand it (the rules on other streets have not changed, but are shown below for information):

The Rules for Each Street

Street Cycle Access
 St Peters Street     Cornmarket General access 5pm to 10am everyday. Motor vehicles have access for loading only.
 Market Place                       Tenant Street                   Irongate                                   Amen Alley  General access 24 hrs a day, 7 days a   week.                                                                   Motor vehicle access is more restricted.
 East Street                               Exchange Street                           St Peters Churchyard    Sadler   Gate No access for cyclists or motor vehicles on these one way streets, at any time, except for loading between 5pm to 10am.
St James’s Street

 

No access for cyclists or motor vehicles in either direction, except for loading   between 5pm to 10am.

Legal Standing:

The changes to access rules on St Peters Street and Cornmarket are covered by a Traffic Regulation Order (TRO) which is a statutory document and therefore cyclists have a legal right to use these streets between the stated times.

The new TRO gives cyclists access at the same times that HGVs, vans and cars have always had for loading, so there should be nothing controversial about that. If cyclists shouldn’t be here at those times, HGVs certainly should not.

Note that the access only applies when entering the pedestrianised area via St Peters Street and Cornmarket. There is no contra-flow cycling on one way streets (eg Albion Street, St Peters Churchyard & East Street); there is no cycling on St James’s Street or Sadler Gate

Signage:

The signs being used to inform the kind of access to streets in the city centre are descrided in a separate post:

                        City Centre Cycle Access Signage

The slabs with the shared use logos, inserted into the paving on St Peters Street, caused confusion and concern when they were removed because no reason was given. It turns out that they were not to specification, and slippery in the wet. Somebody had slipped over on one. We have been told that replacement, non-slip, versions will be provided by the supplier at their cost and will be re-inserted into the street when they arrive.

Responsible Use of Shared Spaces:

Whatever the ins and outs of the limitation of access to “off-peak hours”, or the clarity of the signage, the bottom line is that cyclists now have access to these streets; it removes a crazy anomaly that the vehicles posing most risk of any sort were allowed in, whilst those vehicles posing less risk were barred. Derby Cycling Group celebrates that and welcomes the opportunities for more urban cycle journeys that this provides. Our biggest desire is that everyone who uses these streets does so responsibly and safely and with respect to everyone else. We endorse the principle of the hierarchy of responsibility where those using a heavier, faster vehicle is most responsible for the safety of those using lighter and slower vehicles. However, everyone has responsibilities to use the space considerately and courteously. We hope that the new access regime will be enhanced in the future; whether that happens is in many ways in the hands of the cyclists who use these streets.

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